alexeia_drae: (caress)
Earlier this week there was an article on NPR on how adults have a great deal of nostalgia for music from their parents' generation. The findings of this did not surprise me. When I was a teenager, my fellow orchestra geeks and myself confounded a substitute when she found out that we all loved the Beatles. Yup, while Marilyn Manson was causing people to clutch their pearls in shock and Alanis Morisette broke out with the best break up song ever, teenagers were still listening to the Beatles.

And while I don't think any of us would have put it in these terms because we wanted to retain some sense of being cool, but it was because our parents had been listening to the Beatles for all of our lives. It was familiar. For a lot of us I think the larger question was how could you not like the Beatles!?

Long, speculative thoughts below. )
alexeia_drae: (spoilers)
Finally saw Star Trek: Into Darkness last night! Um, so many squee moment!

Spoilers of what I squeed over )

On Abrams and the Star Wars sequels and portrayals of women in science fiction. )
alexeia_drae: (Default)
I watched The Captains last night. Basically it's a documentary where William Shatner interviews the other actors who have portrayed captains in the Star Trek franchise. Overall, it's a mixed bag, with some parts being incredibly interesting and entertaining and other parts slow and boring. And, of course, Shatner's ego is displayed in its full glory. Still, if you are a Trekker, this is something to see.

I enjoyed the interviews with Patrick Stewart and Kate Mulgrew the most. Stewart and Mulgrew were both rather introspective and even candid about mistakes and regrets that they had. Both seemed to love and appreciate the show and their characters and love the work that they are doing. I must also comment that Patrick Stewart looks amazing! He's aged a little, but he still looks good enough to resume the role at any minute. And Mulgrew's voice has lost a lot of that raspy quality it had (I heard she decided to quit smoking, and if she succeeded I think it helped big time there).

This got long! )

Anyway, this got me thinking, if I could interview only one of the people who have portrayed a captain in a Star Trek tv show, who would I choose? And yes, Chris Pine is not on the list A. because I didn't have enough slots for him and B. because the movies are a bit different in my mind.

[Poll #1801205]

Who would I choose? )
alexeia_drae: (riveramy)
Awhile back ago, I stumbled upon a panel interview with Charisma Carpenter, James Marsters, Julie Benz and Kristy Swanson (one of these things is not like the other).* In it, Charisma Carpenter explained that she was forced to leave Angel because she was pregnant. Disclaimer: I have only seen the first three episodes of Angel. Didn't like it. Don't plan to continue it. So I don't know much about the plotline when she had to leave. Still. This was rather shattering news for me to hear.

Joss Whedon, creator of Buffy, considered to be one of then most feminist shows ever, fired Charisma Carpenter for getting pregnant!? Talk about disillusioning.

Shortly after I had learned this, I was watching an interview with Nana Visitor on the extras of the DS9 discs where she talks about getting pregnant during the show and having her pregnancy written into her character's storyline. Visitor gushed about how thankful she was about not having to hide her pregnancy or getting fired.

What struck me was how in the mainstream view, Star Trek got less props for feminism than Buffy yet the treatment of actresses in similar situations was vastly different, with Star Trek coming out ahead in terms of treatment of actresses who are pregnant (it is worth noting that Martha Hackett who played Seska in Voyager also had her pregnancy written into the storyline, and Gates McFadden and Roxanna Dawson were pregnant during the run of their respective shows).

Over time this led me to ponder such thoughts as these: Is it preferable to have a show that is blatantly racist/sexist, yet the actors who are POC or women are well treated, given good salaries that are on par with the white male characters, etc or to have a show that is progressive in terms of race and sex, yet treats their actors who are POC or women less well then their white male actors or give them salaries that are lower then them?

This got long. )
alexeia_drae: (gilesfunnyhat)
I don't know if I'm just bizarre in this regard, but I see Kira's journey on DS9 as similar to how I would view Buffy's had the show continued for an 8th season (disclaimer, I have not read the comics, I do not plan to read the comics, and I try to avoid everything written about them like the plague).

Bear with me for a minute. Both Kira and Buffy had to grow up too fast. Kira had been fighting in the Bajoran resistance since she was 14. Buffy was 15 when she became a slayer. Both had to put their lives on the line day by day and suffered a lot of trauma. Both lost a lot of loved ones. In Kira's case, the Bajorans succeed in kicking the Cardasians off Bajor, and there are still challenges in the forms of healing their planet and continuing threats from the Cardasians. In Buffy's case, there are still vampires, but now there are other slayers in existence whom she can share her burden with. Heck, she can even take off to Disneyland and take a vacation.

The cut is here. )
alexeia_drae: (victory)
My husband and I have been having a wonderful time re-watching Star Trek: Deep Space Nine together. We just finished up the sixth season tonight, and were watching the extras on the last disc. Included among the extras was an interview with Nana Visitor who played Major Kira Nerys.

Kira rules. Find out why below the cut. )
alexeia_drae: (victory)
My husband and I have been having a wonderful time re-watching Star Trek: Deep Space Nine together. We just finished up the sixth season tonight, and were watching the extras on the last disc. Included among the extras was an interview with Nana Visitor who played Major Kira Nerys.

Kira rules. Find out why below the cut. )
alexeia_drae: (Default)
There's a lot of criticism in fandom over the way women, POC, people who are different abled, and GLBT are presented. As always, some of it is warranted, some of it is not. The saying goes that constructive criticism is important because if you don't know what's wrong then you won't know what to fix. There's truth to that. There's also problems with it.

I'm only hearing negative, no, no, no, bad! (Any other Lisa Loeb fans?) )
alexeia_drae: (Default)
There's a lot of criticism in fandom over the way women, POC, people who are different abled, and GLBT are presented. As always, some of it is warranted, some of it is not. The saying goes that constructive criticism is important because if you don't know what's wrong then you won't know what to fix. There's truth to that. There's also problems with it.

I'm only hearing negative, no, no, no, bad! (Any other Lisa Loeb fans?) )

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