alexeia_drae: (fire)
Andy started reading about the Duggar controversy, and read that Michelle Duggar had to submit sexually to her husband. He started to become rather obsessed with this, and I asked him why, he he said that BDSM was not something he thought those conservative Christian types would be into.

And yes, his mind would think that way.

I explained that it meant that she would have to have sex with him even if she didn't want to and he became horrified and said it was rape.

Yes, ladies and gentlemen, there are men out there who do get it. There are nice men out there who get the girl. Now he and my dad just need to trot down to Arkansas to give the Duggar men a thorough grounding in consent.

more. )
alexeia_drae: (Caroline)
I am so happy with the latest episode because Joss has finally come through and not let me down with the concept. Major spoilers for episode 8! )
alexeia_drae: (Caroline)
I am so happy with the latest episode because Joss has finally come through and not let me down with the concept. Major spoilers for episode 8! )
alexeia_drae: (aperfectlie)
Be forewarned, below the cut are spoilers for Dollhouse episode 6, Man on the Street. You have been warned. )
alexeia_drae: (aperfectlie)
Be forewarned, below the cut are spoilers for Dollhouse episode 6, Man on the Street. You have been warned. )
alexeia_drae: (Default)
"Law & Order: SVU" is definitely a rarity in my TV schedule, seeing as I tend to prefer science fiction and fantasy. But I do appreciate their sensitive handling of delicate subject matter. For too long rape and abuse has been a tabboo subject that has been swept under the rug. It is through awareness of a problem that we can work towards ending that problem.

Yet lately I have been disturbed by a trend I've seen. It started in the 5th season when ADA Alexandra Cabot was shot when prosecuting a case against a drug ring in the episode "Loss." Shortly after she was shot, she was whisked away by the Witness Protection Program so that the drug ring would no longer harm her.

This one incidence in and of itself didn't bother me. Sadly, police officers, lawyers, social workers, and others who fight crime often get caught in the cross fire and end up being victimized themselves. What has bothered me is that in the show two more acts of extreme violence have been used against two of the three regular female cast members: ADA Casey Novak and Detective Olivia Benson. On the show thus far, none of the male characters have been subjected to extreme violence specifically targeted against him. The message that is starting to form is that women are victims, even if they are tough detectives who carry guns or strong lawyers who prosecute criminals while men are protected from the hazards of working with a dangerous population.

In Novak's case, in the episode "Night" she was investiagting the rape of women who were illegal immigrants when the brother of one became upset and brutally attacked Novak to regain his family honor. Novak woke up in the hospital, her face heavily bruised and was later shown using crutches. In "Undercover" Detective Benson goes undercover in a prison to investigate allegations that a male cop was raping prisoners there. During her time there, she is nearly raped by the guard, rescued just in the nick of time by a male detective who had been placed there to make sure she was safe.

Let me make clear what I am taking issue with. I don't mind the fact that they got hurt in the line of duty. Det Stabler, a male, was once thrown through a window while restraining another man high on PCP. Det Benson had her throat slashed while pursuing a suspect who had abducted two children. These were events that happened during the heat of the moment without anyone being targeted. In Cabot, Novak, and during Benson's jail case, they were specifically targeted to get shot, beaten, or raped. These were planned events on the part of the perpetrator. Instead, a woman believed to have Dissociate Identity Disorder holds Detective Stabler's pregnant wife hostage, hurting him through a female member of his family. Thus, the man himself can only be hurt through female family members.

In my mind, Benson's near rape was the most disturbing in my mind. In addition to the fact that she has been stalked by a man she unjustly put in jail who later went and murdered other victims she helped in "Wrath" and that she was targeted by a psychopath in season 1 in "Stalked," the sole female detective on the show (with the exception of Jeffries who only lasted one season) is put in the place of victim much more than her male counterparts. Detectives Stabler, Munch, and Tutuola and their boss, Craggin, never seem to run into those problems.

Benson is held hostage twice. Once in "Authority" and again in "Escape." I cannot remember any incidence where any of the male detectives were held hostage.

So I was already aware of the trend of Benson being the "victim" in the group of detectives. The attemtped rape pushed that label to such extremes that I was left wondering why they even included it in the show. Yes, women get raped in prisons and nothing is done about it. But men also get raped in prisons, and even less is done about that. Why not have one of the male detectives go undercover and nearly get raped instead of placing Benson in the victim seat once again if their intent was to highlight the issue?

Benson was already the detective who emphasized well with the victims, so the attempted rape was not necessary to help her relate to them better. All I can think of was that they did it to add more drama, which is a pathetic excuse in my mind. Capitalizing on the sole female detective's sexual assault to raise ratings. That should not be what the show is about.

The trend is starting to get disturbing. As of season 9 (I've not seen season 10), three of the five women whose names have appeared on the credits have been assaulted during the course of the show. None of the six men have. Do the men possess an innate field of security due to their gender that the female workers lack? Or do the crazies all go through the men's female family members, like what happened to Stabler?

Is the message that SVU wants to pass onto its viewers that if you're a female crime fighter you're going to become a vitcim at some point? I surely hope not. And I surely hope that they wake up to the message they are speaking.
alexeia_drae: (Default)
"Law & Order: SVU" is definitely a rarity in my TV schedule, seeing as I tend to prefer science fiction and fantasy. But I do appreciate their sensitive handling of delicate subject matter. For too long rape and abuse has been a tabboo subject that has been swept under the rug. It is through awareness of a problem that we can work towards ending that problem.

Yet lately I have been disturbed by a trend I've seen. It started in the 5th season when ADA Alexandra Cabot was shot when prosecuting a case against a drug ring in the episode "Loss." Shortly after she was shot, she was whisked away by the Witness Protection Program so that the drug ring would no longer harm her.

This one incidence in and of itself didn't bother me. Sadly, police officers, lawyers, social workers, and others who fight crime often get caught in the cross fire and end up being victimized themselves. What has bothered me is that in the show two more acts of extreme violence have been used against two of the three regular female cast members: ADA Casey Novak and Detective Olivia Benson. On the show thus far, none of the male characters have been subjected to extreme violence specifically targeted against him. The message that is starting to form is that women are victims, even if they are tough detectives who carry guns or strong lawyers who prosecute criminals while men are protected from the hazards of working with a dangerous population.

In Novak's case, in the episode "Night" she was investiagting the rape of women who were illegal immigrants when the brother of one became upset and brutally attacked Novak to regain his family honor. Novak woke up in the hospital, her face heavily bruised and was later shown using crutches. In "Undercover" Detective Benson goes undercover in a prison to investigate allegations that a male cop was raping prisoners there. During her time there, she is nearly raped by the guard, rescued just in the nick of time by a male detective who had been placed there to make sure she was safe.

Let me make clear what I am taking issue with. I don't mind the fact that they got hurt in the line of duty. Det Stabler, a male, was once thrown through a window while restraining another man high on PCP. Det Benson had her throat slashed while pursuing a suspect who had abducted two children. These were events that happened during the heat of the moment without anyone being targeted. In Cabot, Novak, and during Benson's jail case, they were specifically targeted to get shot, beaten, or raped. These were planned events on the part of the perpetrator. Instead, a woman believed to have Dissociate Identity Disorder holds Detective Stabler's pregnant wife hostage, hurting him through a female member of his family. Thus, the man himself can only be hurt through female family members.

In my mind, Benson's near rape was the most disturbing in my mind. In addition to the fact that she has been stalked by a man she unjustly put in jail who later went and murdered other victims she helped in "Wrath" and that she was targeted by a psychopath in season 1 in "Stalked," the sole female detective on the show (with the exception of Jeffries who only lasted one season) is put in the place of victim much more than her male counterparts. Detectives Stabler, Munch, and Tutuola and their boss, Craggin, never seem to run into those problems.

Benson is held hostage twice. Once in "Authority" and again in "Escape." I cannot remember any incidence where any of the male detectives were held hostage.

So I was already aware of the trend of Benson being the "victim" in the group of detectives. The attemtped rape pushed that label to such extremes that I was left wondering why they even included it in the show. Yes, women get raped in prisons and nothing is done about it. But men also get raped in prisons, and even less is done about that. Why not have one of the male detectives go undercover and nearly get raped instead of placing Benson in the victim seat once again if their intent was to highlight the issue?

Benson was already the detective who emphasized well with the victims, so the attempted rape was not necessary to help her relate to them better. All I can think of was that they did it to add more drama, which is a pathetic excuse in my mind. Capitalizing on the sole female detective's sexual assault to raise ratings. That should not be what the show is about.

The trend is starting to get disturbing. As of season 9 (I've not seen season 10), three of the five women whose names have appeared on the credits have been assaulted during the course of the show. None of the six men have. Do the men possess an innate field of security due to their gender that the female workers lack? Or do the crazies all go through the men's female family members, like what happened to Stabler?

Is the message that SVU wants to pass onto its viewers that if you're a female crime fighter you're going to become a vitcim at some point? I surely hope not. And I surely hope that they wake up to the message they are speaking.

Profile

alexeia_drae: (Default)
alexeia_drae

September 2017

S M T W T F S
      1 2
3 45678 9
101112131415 16
171819 20212223
24252627282930

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Sep. 20th, 2017 07:38 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios